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Opel GT Concept To Debut In Geneva

While General Motors is making waves in North America with the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV that was unveiled earlier this month, the European arm of the manufacturer has released a few images of their new sports car design study.
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While General Motors is making waves in North America with the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV that was unveiled earlier this month, the European arm of the manufacturer has released a few images of their new sports car design study.

The Opel GT Concept will make its world debut at the Geneva Auto Show in early March, and according to the GM, “this is how sports cars will look in [the] future.”

Designers created a pure, minimalistic shape wrapped around a rear-drive, front-mid-engine layout. The concept doesn’t have door handles or outside mirrors, which is okay because it’s, ah, a concept. The vehicle is said to be a direct descendant of the admittedly beautiful Opel GT – produced between 1968 and 1973 – as well as the Monza Concept that was shown at the 2013 Frankfurt Auto Show. However, the brand points out that apart from the long hood, short deck styling, the concept’s design isn’t inspired by the original Opel GT. They sure do look similar.

The Opel GT Concept features a two-tone, silver and black body, split by a red stripe that flows from the front fender to base of the rear window. In addition, the rear tires are black, while the front ones are red, and they’re mounted on alloy wheels that boast a “roller-skate” design. The car’s doors feature integrated side windows, meaning a near-invisible transition from painted surface to glass.

Positioned up front, but behind the axle is a turbocharged, 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine that develops 145 horsepower and 151 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automated transmission sends power to the rear wheels, and can be controlled via wheel-mounted paddle shifters. According to Opel, the concept weighs less than 1,000 kilograms and can squirt from 0 to 100 km/h in less than eight seconds.