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Here's what happened at the border in March

Thursday, April 25, 2013   by: SooToday.com Staff

NEWS RELEASE

CANADA BORDER
SERVICES AGENCY

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Sault Ste. Marie port of entry monthly enforcement highlights

SAULT STE. MARIE - The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) facilitates the entry of legitimate travellers and goods, while protecting the safety and security of Canadians and ensuring that Canada's border is not used for illegal activity.

This work is carried out by CBSA border services officers (BSOs) who ensure that the people, goods and conveyances entering Canada meet all requirements and are compliant with Canadian law.

In March 2013, CBSA officers at the Sault Ste. Marie port of entry (POE) processed 107,402 travellers in 71,632 vehicles which represents an eight percent decrease in travellers and a five percent decrease in vehicles from March 2012.

The POE also processed 3,294 commercial importations, which is a 13 percent decrease from March 2012, and more than 172 international travellers by bus.

Immigration highlights

In March, officers at the Sault Ste. Marie POE conducted more than 246 immigration interviews resulting in the issuance of 13 visitor records, two study permits, 22 work permits, two temporary resident permits and 22 individuals were given the option of voluntarily withdrawing their application to enter Canada due to various admissibility issues.

On March 15, a U.S. resident was referred for a secondary immigration examination.

After completing a criminal background check, officers discovered that he was convicted of sexual assault of a minor and had previously been denied entry to Canada for this offence.

He was advised to apply for individual rehabilitation from a Canadian Consulate in the United States before attempting to enter Canada in the future.

He was allowed to withdraw his application to enter Canada and he returned to the United States.

On March 30, a U.S. resident was referred for a secondary immigration examination due to her lack of documentation to enter Canada.

Upon completion of a criminal background check, officers discovered that she had been convicted of several offences including harassment, aggravated robbery, robbery, and battery.

She was advised to apply for individual rehabilitation from a Canadian Consulate in the United States prior to attempting to enter Canada again.

She was also advised of acceptable documentation that U.S. residents must present when entering Canada.

She was allowed to withdraw her application to enter Canada and returned to the United States.

Customs highlights

During the month of March, CBSA officers conducted approximately 491 secondary examinations for customs purposes or on behalf of other government departments, initiated five seizure actions, two arrests and issued additional written warnings for undeclared or undervalued goods.

On March 1, four U.S. residents arrived at the POE and declared only a pack of cigarettes.

The individuals were referred for a secondary examination where officers noticed that one of the travellers was nervous and restless.

While conducting the examination, officers discovered a can containing suspected marijuana and hashish.

One of the individuals then took ownership of the contents and was arrested for smuggling or attempting to smuggle goods into Canada under the Customs Act.

He was allowed to withdraw his application to enter Canada and all four travellers returned to the United States.

On March 31, a U.S. resident attempting to travel through Canada en route to New York was referred for a secondary examination.

While conducting the secondary search, officers discovered a bag of suspected marijuana seeds weighing 195 grams, as well as a small amount of suspected marijuana.

The individual was arrested for smuggling or attempting to smuggle goods under the Customs Act.

Due to this offence, he was given the option of withdrawing his application to enter Canada and he returned to the United States.

Travel tips

The CBSA reminds travellers to truthfully declare all purchases and goods received outside of Canada upon their return.

Smuggling, undervaluation and other Customs Act offences may lead to seizure and/or prosecution in a court of law.

All firearms and weapons must be declared to a border services officer when you enter Canada.

Failure to do so could result in them being seized, and you may face criminal charges.

Certain foreign nationals who do not meet the requirements to overcome their criminal inadmissibility may be allowed to enter Canada with a one-time only fee-exempt temporary resident permit.

For more information, please visit the Citizenship and Immigration Canada website.

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Comments
2
Note: Comments that appear on the site are not the opinion of SooToday.com. If you see an abusive post, please click the link beside the post to report it.
crashed13 4/26/2013 8:08:18 AM Report

That should drop when Homeland Security add there new crossing fee this fall.
frnlak 4/26/2013 11:25:19 AM Report

Five dollars a head.
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