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Editorials

Death by measles?

Wednesday, April 16, 2014   by: Dr. W. Gifford-Jones

How would you react if your unvaccinated child or grandchild died from measles?

No doubt your response would be one of agonizing grief.

What you wouldn’t know is that this personal tragedy did not have to happen in 2014.

Unfortunately, I bet not one doctor in a thousand knows how Dr. Frederick Klenner successfully treated this viral infection over 60 years ago.

Doctors are not the only ones unaware of Dr. Klenner.

One of Canada’s leading newspapers recently reported that there was no specific antiviral treatment for this highly infectious disease.

It was wrong.

This newspaper editor committed a major error by not reading history.

Worldwide measles has been in the past one of the major causes of death among young children.

It’s estimated that before the measles vaccine became available nearly three million children died every year from this disease.

Today, in this country about 95 percent of children are vaccinated against measles.

But in some areas the rate drops as low as 50 percent making these children highly susceptible to this infection.

Particularly, when they travel abroad and bring the virus back home or when foreigners carry it to North America.

Now, several cases of measles have appeared in various parts of Canada.

Measles should not be looked on as a minor disease, as death occurs in about one to two percent of cases.

Moreover, the complications are far from minor ones.

Some children develop pneumonia, severe diarrhea and dehydration, encephalitis with swelling of the brain and in some cases blindness.

What a tragedy when a vaccine to eradicate it has been available for years.

So who is Dr. Frederick Klenner?

He graduated from Duke University School of Medicine in 1936 and entered private practice in Reidsville, South Carolina.

He believed that natural remedies were safer than drugs.

In the ‘Clinical Guide to the Use of Vitamin C” Dr. Lendon H. Smith outlines numerous cases on how Dr. Klenner quickly cured a variety of viral diseases by the use of intravenous vitamin C.

He reports of a ten-month-old baby with high fever, watery nose, dry cough, red eyes and rash characteristic of measles.

Dr Klenner gave the baby 1,000 milligrams (mg) of vitamin C every four hours and the temperature dropped, the cough stopped and the rash disappeared.   

Another eight-year-old child with measles developed encephalitis, became  stuporous and responded only to pain.

He quickly cured the child by both intravenous and oral vitamin C.

A 23-year-old man with mumps developed swollen testicles, the size of tennis balls, along with overwhelming pain.

After 1,000 mg of intravenous vitamin C the pain subsided.

During the next 24 hours he was given 2,000 mg of intravenous C every two hours.

His fever returned to normal in 36 hours and he was up and about in 60 hours.

Dr. Lendon Smith describes how Klenner discovered that intravenous C could also quickly dry up chicken pox lesions and subdue viral hepatitis.

But Dr. Klenner’s most important study involved the great polio epidemic of 1948-50.

He successfully treated 60 polio victims using intravenous doses of vitamin C, up to 200,000 mg every 12 hours for four days.

None developed paralysis.

He soon learned that the sicker the patient the higher the dose required.

Vitamin C works by entering all cells where it neutralizes toxins and viruses.

It’s been aptly said that “Unless white blood cells are saturated with vitamin C, they are like soldiers without bullets.”

It is hard to know how this renewal of measles virus in Canada will end.

Some people with measles fail to following instructions to isolate themselves from others and will spread the infection.

But how tragic that some may die due to the dust collecting on the work of Dr. Klenner.  

Critics claim that vitamin C is ineffective.

But they’re all making the same error of failing to use sufficient amounts for a sufficient period of time.

Klenner’s advice to doctors was right to the point.

He said he had never seen a patient who could not benefit by vitamin C. He added that while doctors are pondering the diagnosis, they should be giving plenty of vitamin C.

See the website www.docgiff.com. For comments info@docgiff.com

Comments
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buffy 4/16/2014 1:31:00 PM Report

Really glad to have Dr. Gifford-Jones as a contributor to the Sootday...I've always read his columns with great interest. Thanks.
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